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A Meeting of the Minds at the Greener Gadgets Conference

This is held once a year! A must see

This is held once a year! A must see

New York City just hosted last week’s “Greener Gadgets Conference” to aid in the awareness of making consumer electronics “greener” in the ways they are manufactured, used, and disposed. Co-produced by CES sponsor, CEA, this is the second of these annual meetings. The topics discussed at the GGC stem from a public concern about the need for eco-friendly products now. It is no longer a problem that only will one day face our descendents, because it is affecting us now.

A primary concern that arised at the conference was whether manufacturing standards reflect this need to be “green.” Though there a growing popularity of marketing the eco-friendliness of products and services, when will standards show the value of making “green” products by reflecting this trend as well? Indeed, people who are shopping for “green” CES are also concerned with product efficiency and performance, mainly in the department of saving energy. Unfortunately, the measurable effects on environment such as carbon footprint are only made aware to businesses and government, while consumers see savings in the form of dollar signs.

At the Greener Gadgets Conference, recyclability was a large topic on the table. The functioning of

just some ideas with more to come

just some ideas with more to come

programs and end result for recyclable products offered up by consumers were the main ideas discussed. According to David Thompson, director of Panasonic’s Corporate Environmental Department, the pressure is on manufacturers of electronics to remain environmentally conscious through all the activities of business, including use of their products. Panasonic is teaming up with Toshiba and Sharp in the MRM Co. (Manufacturers Recycling Management Company), which is a shareholder in the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation. As a Sharp dealer, Advanced Technology Services is proud of the efforts that are being made by these companies to respect and preserve our environment.

Other efforts by companies and individuals to create new “green” products and programs were showcased at the conference. For instance, customers are now able to buy carbon offset cards for their mobile phones according to Michael Newman, vice president of cell phone recycler ReCellular. Four inventions to make consumers aware of energy usage were displayed at the conference. One was the power hog piggy bank, a plug-in device for children that helps them understand energy usage. Also, a wooden indoor laundry drying rack creates less energy waste because there is less dryer usage. The tweet-a-watt is a device set up to relay a consumers’ energy usage to friends via twitter. Finally, the laundry pod was introduced, an electricity-free washer that operates like a salad spinner. The field of CE is looking for more and more ways to be “green,” so stay tuned!

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March 4, 2009 Posted by | 1 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

House Votes Against Delaying Digital Conversion

house-of-representativesHouse Votes Against Delaying Digital Conversion When brought up for vote in the House of Representatives, the bill proposing a delay of the digital broadcast conversion from February 17 to June 12, was defeated. It did not receive a two-thirds majority vote, which was needed to pass the bill. The vote was 258 in favor (236-Dem, 22-Rep) and 168 against (155-Rep, 13-Dem). The bill could be brought up again for regular floor vote, in which case, it would only require a majority vote to be passed. The “mostly” democratic support of the bill to delay the conversion is based on the fact that they believe that a large number of households (6.5 million) are unprepared for the conversion, a statistic which is confirmed by the Nielsen Co. These citizens are particularly among the poor, rural, and low-income representation of Americans, who either live in areas that receive major stations through analog signal or can’t afford to purchase the equipment necessary to receive signal after the conversion. The government has made coupons available for $40 toward the purchase of a digital conversion box; however there is currently a wait list of 3.2 million requests. The National Telecommunications & Information Administration is only sending out new coupons as older, unredeemed coupons reach the 90-day expiration. Joe Barton, republican congressman of Texas, is pushing for legislation that will aid in this problem without postponing the conversion. Most republicans feel there is no need to delay the conversion. Those against the bill believe that it would incur heavy costs for public safety agencies and wireless companies who are waiting to use the spectrum that will become free after the conversion. Television stations, as well, would be required to pay more to operate both systems for several more months, an expense that is most likely not built into this year’s budget. In addition, Jonathan Collegio, of the National Association of Broadcasters, has voiced that the Nielsen Co.’s statistic on number of unprepared households does not take in to account those who have purchased a converter box and not installed it; those who have requested, but not received coupons; or those who subscribe to cable or satellite television for their home theater system. The Obama administration has not made a comment in reference to the outcome of the vote.

February 4, 2009 Posted by | Digital Conversion | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

All you need to know about buying a HDTV and more

glossary_pic_with_wordsSo you know that it’s time to shop for a new television. You also know that you want a big, beautiful, colorful, clear picture and a booming and well-balanced sound, so why can’t the product specs tag say just that? Sorting through the list of impressive numbers and lingo can be a labyrinth for someone who is unfamiliar with what these terms actually mean. Let’s get down to business with some of these commonly used descriptions and find out what really matters when shopping for a high-definition TV set:
HDTV: High-Definition Television. This is the high-resolution subset of our HDTV system. The FCC has no official definition for HDTV. The ATSC defines HDTV as a 16:9 image with twice the horizontal and vertical resolution of our existing system, which is accompanied by 5.1 channels of Dolby Digital audio. The CEA defines HDTV as an image with 720 progressive or 1080 interlaced active (top to bottom) scan lines. 1280:720p and 1920:1080i are typically accepted as high-definition scan rates.
SDTV: Standard Definition Television. This is the lower resolution subset of the ATSC’s DTV system. 480i is typically accepted as an SD signal. Digital broadcasters can offer multiple sub-programs at SDTV quality, as opposed to one or two HD programs. Digital satellite and digital cable often refer to the majority of their programs as SDTV, somewhat erroneously, as neither system has anything to do with DTV, though both, technically, consist of a digital 480i signal.
Plasma: Flat-panel display technology that ignites small pockets of gas to light phosphors. They are known for excellent image quality and superior color contrast.
LCD: Liquid Crystal Display. A display that consists of two polarizing transparent panels and a liquid crystal surface sandwiched in between. Voltage is applied to certain areas, causing the crystal to turn dark. A light source behind the panel transmits through transparent crystals and is mostly blocked by dark crystals. An LCD television is known for a bright and vibrant picture, but may give an inconsistent picture quality and color contrast from seats that are not directly in front of the screen.
DLP: Digital Light Processing. This is a Texas Instruments process of projecting video images using a light source reflecting off of an array of tens of thousands of microscopic mirrors. Each mirror represents a pixel and reflects light toward the lens for white and away from it for black, modulating in between for various shades of gray. Three-chip versions use separate arrays for the red, green, and blue colors. Single-chip arrays use a color-filter wheel that alternates each filter color in front of the mirror array at appropriate intervals.
Virtual surround sound: The television’s built-in speakers are not going to meet the same quality of a surround sound system that is purchased separately with several speakers. However, it will attempt to produce the equivalent of the sound of a home theater installation of surround sound.
Contrast: Relative difference between the brightest and darkest parts of an image. A contrast control adjusts the peak white level of a display device.
Black Level: Light level of the darker portions of a video image. A black level control sets the light level of the darkest portion of the video signal to match that of the display’s black level capability. Black is, of course, the absence of light. Many displays, however, have as much difficulty shutting off the light in the black portions of an image as they do creating light in the brighter portions. CRT-based displays usually have better black levels than DLP, plasma, and LCD, which rank, generally, in that order.
Energy Star qualified: The most recent rules are called Energy Star 3.0. These require the product to perform at a certain level of maximum power consumption when in use. It is best to find a TV that meets these guidelines. The older rules are not as strict on energy consumption, because they pertain to when the set is on standby, not when it is in use.

Aspect ratio: The ratio of image width to image height. Common motion-picture ratios are 1.85:1 and 2.35:1. Television screens are usually 1.33:1 (also known as 4:3), which is similar to the Academy standard for films in the ’50s. HDTV is 1.78:1, or 16:9. When widescreen movies (films with aspect ratios wider than 1.33:1) are displayed on 1.33:1 televisions, the image must be letterboxed, anamorphically squeezed, or panned-and-scanned to fit the screen.24p, or 1080p24: A set with this feature can show 24 frames per second, exactly the way movies are shot. Cinephiles may notice smoother, more cinematic images, but the feature works only with Blu-ray players connected by HDMI cables.
120 Hz: The display will smooth out motion, making scenes with action or a moving camera look sharper. Expect to pay more for these sets.
720p: The display has low resolution, but is still high-definition. Adequate for screens smaller than 40 inches, or ones meant to be watched from more than 12 feet away.
1080p: The display has high resolution. Good for screens larger than 40 inches, or ones used for gaming, as computer displays, or for Blu-ray playback.
Anamorphic: Process that horizontally condenses (squeezes) a 16:9 image into a 4:3 space, preserving 25 percent more vertical resolution than letterboxing into the 4:3 space. For the signal to appear with correct geometry, the display must either horizontally expand or vertically squish the image. Used on about two or three promotional laser discs and many DVDs. This may also be referred to as “Enhanced for Widescreen” or “Enhanced for 16:9.”
HDMI: HDTV connection format using a DVI interface that transfers uncompressed digital video with HDCP copy protection and multichannel audio.
VGA: An input for a computer video signal. Many newer computers can use the higher-quality HDMI inputs instead, so VGA is not essential even if you plan to connect your PC to your TV.
ATSC: Advanced Television Systems Committee. This is a government-directed committee that developed our digital television transmission system. The ATSC tuner allows reception of digital television signals broadcast in North America, and is typically a standard feature in HDTVs.
NTSC: National Television Standards Committee. This is a government-directed committee that established the U.S. color TV standard in 1953. Also known, sarcastically, as Never Twice the Same Color or Never The Same Color due to the inherent difficulty in achieving proper color calibration. The NTSC tuner is for analog broadcast TV. These signals will not be used after the digital conversion this year, so don’t pay attention to this feature.
Composite: This is a low-quality video connector for older game consoles and VCRs, which is not able to carry a high-definition signal.
Component: A high-quality, three-lead connector for game consoles, DVD players and cable boxes, which is able to carry a high-definition signal, but is not quite as good as HDMI.
As a custom audio video dealer we looking forward to bringing you home theater or mobile satellite dish to life.

January 30, 2009 Posted by | General Information | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

LCD vs. Plasma: The Battle is On

plasma vs lcdAdmit it. When shopping for electronics, some of us are more gifted and knowledgeable than others. There can be so many factors in the decision of which television to choose for your home theater system, such as size, type, brand, and so on. And now, the answer to the question we’ve all been waiting for: “Which is better, plasma or LCD?”

Advantages of Plasma plasmatv

Color.

A plasma screen displays color more vibrantly. The black is a deep ink color, which creates better color contrast. This is good for those who use multiple film sources because it gives a more cinematic and three-dimensional picture. People and things in the picture look more realistic on a plasma tv. Plasma is a good choice if you can control the amount of ambient light in the room. Pioneer and Pioneer Elite are two brands that are best known for the use of the deepest black screen color.

Unlimited viewing angle.

The image on a plasma screen is consistent when viewed from any seat in the room. Plasma maximizes brightness of color and contrast, unlike an LCD, on which the picture vibrancy may fade if you are not sitting directly in front of the screen.

No screen blur.

Plasmas do not blur or smear images from motion on screen, like LCD’s are prone to do. Plasmas are known for image clearness.

Lower cost.

In general, plasmas have been less expensive that LCD’s. However, this is not always the case for top-end and larger size models.

Advantages of LCD

Brightness.

In a well-lit room, the screen display of an LCD tv will perform with excellence in the category of brightness. If ambient light is not a strong point in the room, a plasma tv may be a better choice.

No glare.

The screen of an LCD is designed with a matte finish. This is a prime difference between it and the plasma television, and is often a matter of personal preference when making the decision between the two. Keep in mind that not every LCD is this way, so double check before purchasing.

No image retention.

An LCD has one up on the plasma, in that a plasma may retain the imprint of an image if it remains on the screen for too long. This is an issue that some manufacturers have tried to counteract by creating a screen saver that enables after a certain amount of time has passed to keep the screen of a plasma protected.

Energy efficiency.

Typically, LCD’s use less power than plasmas do per square inch, making them more eco-friendly and wallet-friendly. Again, manufacturers are aware of this concern for consumers and are therefore creating energy-saving models for both types of tvs, so the significance of this benefit for LCD’s is diminishing.

Your way, right away.

Currently, there seem to be more choice in variety, style, and size for an LCD due to more market presence. Plasmas are out there and are becoming more popular as well.

The Conclusion?

To sum it up, when purchasing a television, you get what you pay for. A higher end model of either LCD or plasma is a great investment long term if you can afford the price tag. Although LCD’s have been more expensive in the past, the price for larger televisions of both types are becoming closer and more competitive, as the focus has now been put on the product features and performance.

For more information on RV Mobile Satellite check out our website at http://www.advtechservices.net

January 17, 2009 Posted by | General Information | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Pioneer Releasing Four New Receivers

Pioneer is rolling out a line of four new audio receivers promising a whole new level of sound quality, compatibility and connectivity for your home theater system.

The model series VSX-1019AH-K Pioneer A/V Receivers will be available at your Pioneer dealer in April, 2009.
Price is typically the first thing on your mind. You can buy one starting at $200 and increasing at $100 increments to end at $500 for the top model. Not too shabby, ‘eh? pioneer-elite-av-receiver
What will your buck buy you?

With each of the new Pioneer models you get improved sound quality when you play your mp3s thanks to their Advanced Sound Retriever. Basically, that means data lost in compressed files (mp3s) is restored to exceptional quality.

I don’t know about you, but constantly adjusting the volume when switching between sources gets a little annoying. Pioneer’s Auto Level Control maintains a consistent sound level even when you switch from a CD, mp3, DVD, or BLU-RAY to television programming. That means, the sound level you selected for one medium is maintained even after changing to something else, no blaring commercials or too quiet movies. Less tinkering for you!

$200: The most basic of the new Pioneer A/V receivers. This offers deep color, 110 Watts x 5 @ 1 kHz, new home theater system remote, BLU-RAY ready and a front USB port, among several other features.
$300: Stepping up. This one includes everything you get for $200 and HD, Lip Sync, iPod plug and play, Sirius satellite radio (with on screen display) and a preset remote.

$400: Getting cooler. 120 Watts x 7, P.H.A.T. II @ 1 kHz, room calibration (sounds great no matter how you have your home theater sound system arranged), KURO link, Multi zone (you can watch a movie in your living room with surround sound and someone else can listen to a CD in another room).

$500: Now this is fantastic. Everything included for $400 and iPod multi zone, more inputs, Faroudja 1080p Video Scaler (makes analog picture better quality on your screen) and a nifty remote.

This may sound like a lot to you, and it is. To get the most out of your money and your new Pioneer receiver, professional installation is suggested (though not required for you die hard do-it-yourselfers).

January 15, 2009 Posted by | New Products | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

America: Not Ready for the Digital Switch

By Dawn Hatchard

Everyone, in theory, is supposed to be ready for the analog to digital switch for television reception. The big day is slated for Feb. 17, 2009.

The government has been educating Americans with commercials about the converter box, coupons and the deadline since January, 2008. Are you one of the estimated million people who has been procrastinating getting your government coupon for a converter box?

With 10 million coupons yet to be redeemed, there is a lengthy waitlist for the issue of new coupons. Apparently, they have exhausted funding and ran out of the coupons themselves. This may be particularly troublesome for rural low-income families.

If you are simply a procrastinator you have other alternatives. Going without your fix of evening news, daytime court shows or favorite network sitcom may not be necessary.

This could very well be your golden opportunity to update and upgrade your home entertainment experience. Satellite services are more affordable than ever, offering more channels and HD satellite quality for less than you spend a week on your favorite beverages.

Rabbit ears and rooftop antennas may be troublesome to obtain decent reception, not to mention unattractive. Similar reception issues are expected with the new digital system. There may be less fuzz in the picture, but there will be lag and pauses in programming as your converter box searches for a signal.

With satellite services, even the most rural residents get the reception needed to follow HDTV Switchprogramming. The major Satellite television companies also offer free DVR (digital video recording) capabilities built in to their boxes. DVR is the best thing since motion picture itself, trust me on this one. It also happens to be user friendly. You will not be able to imagine how you ever watched TV without it.

January 13, 2009 Posted by | Digital Conversion | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Government Runs out of DTV Coupons

By Jonathan Ruspil

Well it looks as if the Government has overspent once again. If you are looking to upgrade converter-boxyour home theater systems it is time to do it now. The Associated Press has reported that the National Telecommunications and Information Administration has already used up all of its 1.34 billion dollar budget that it allocated for DTV coupons. These coupons are good for 40 dollars off the price of a DTV converter box that will be needed come February 17th 2009.

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration has been lobbying congress to give them more money towards the program or allow them to issue more coupons to full fill the demand it is encountering. The NTIA is projecting (according to the AP) that roughly 350,000 coupons expire each week from people who fail to use them within the 90 day time period they are given. So although they have run out of money technically they are getting 350,000 coupons back each week to reissue to people that are on the waiting list. If you have not applied for a coupon yet you can apply for one at DTV2009.gov. The quicker you can sign up and get on the waiting list the better.

January 10, 2009 Posted by | Digital Conversion | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

February 17th – Everything Goes Digital: Preparing for the Change

Are you prepared for this big change?

converter_box_program_dtv
One simple thing you can do to guarantee that you will be able to continue viewing your favorite television shows once the changeover from analog to digital signal is complete. Order cable or satellite service! Some cable companies are primed and ready for the transition from analog to digital signal. Secondly, you don’t have to worry about putting a dent in your checkbook, because cable and satellite can be as inexpensive as $14.99/month for basic service. Basic service offers 24 channels and you will still be able to catch Dancing With the Stars, The Mentalist and all your favorite shows.

Another solution is to purchase a converter box. These boxes range in price between $50 and $70. The government is currently offering a $40 coupon toward the purchase of a converter box (maximum of two per household). Each coupon is valid for 90 days and is good for only one box. In order to get your coupon(s), visit the website at http://www.dtv2009.gov or you can call (1-888-DTV-2009) to have one shipped to you. The converter boxes can be complicated to set up, so feel free to contact us with any questions at contact us.

A third option is to replace your current television with an HDTV that comes ready with a digital tuner. This will eliminate the need for the extra piece of equipment (the converter box) in your entertainment cabinet. Retailers nationwide will be trying to increase sales in response to this change in technology, so be on the lookout for great deals on electronics from your favorite local shops. Look for deals on brand like Pioneer Elite , Pioneer , Samsung , and LG . Advanced Technology Services has a great line of products as well and is motivated to help you find the exact TV you are looking for. If you don’t have the money for a new television right away, try one of the first two options mentioned above instead.

The advantages of switching to digital are that the quality of sound and images are so much greater than they were with analog. Digital allows for more programming choices because it is much more efficient than analog due to the rate of compression. If you have cable or satellite, digital service provides more channels and includes some high-definition channels. Once the crossover to digital is complete, you will encounter fewer problems with your programming, due to the fact that digital is not affected as easily by double imaging and noise.

To some, hearing the words “February 17th” may bring the same feeling of dread as the words “April 15th”. There is no reason to be worried if you are informed and you know you are in good hands. We want to be here for you to help answer your questions and find the products and services you need during this time of change and in the future, so don’t hesitate to contact us

January 6, 2009 Posted by | Digital Conversion | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Analog Signal to Digital Broadcasting

On February 18, 2009, all full-power television broadcasting stations will be required by law to transition from analog signal to digital broadcasting.  The publicity surrounding this changeover has many television owners questioning and needing information from a trustworthy source.  As a family-owned and operated business, Advanced Technology Services feels we owe it to our customers to give you the most accurate information available.  We want to help you make decisions with which you are secure.

First, it is important for you to know that this conversion to digital signal by most stations does exclude some broadcasts.  Those stations who broadcast through low-power (Class A) translators do not fall under this federal mandate, and may continue to operate analog signals until they choose to cross over.  These low-power translators operate in areas where the full-power TV stations are unable to broadcast, sometimes due to the geography and topography of the land.  This is the case for many areas near where we are located in Southern Oregon, such as valleys, mountains, and remote areas.  In these areas, the low-power translators extend the signal from the full-power stations through analog signal.  They may also broadcast shows from smaller TV stations, such as ethnic or religious programming.

For those who live in areas which are service by the low-power translators, an ATSC digital/NTSC analog tuner or a digital converter box with analog pass through will be necessary to continue to receive the analog broadcasts.  Most electronic stores carry these products and can be purchased by using a $40.00 coupon that is now being offered by the government.  Be sure that the box does satisfy the above-mentioned requirements before purchasing.  If the box does not have analog pass through, it will either need an adapted form of wiring hook-up or will need to be disconnected in order to view the analog channels.

More info on this can be found on our website as a motosat dealer we will be bringing you more information for mobile systems in the blogs to come.

December 16, 2008 Posted by | Digital Conversion | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments