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Who’s the Lucky Winner? (Of Circuit City’s Former Customers)

circuit-cityWith the recent resignation of Circuit City from the retail face of consumer electronics, what will happen to the business of Circuit City’s former customers? Results do not look promising for consumer electronics specialists like dealers and small businesses, who undoubtedly would give customers a more personal and service-backed purchasing experience. In a survey, it was revealed that 66% of Circuit City’s customers would be taking their business to Best Buy (55%) or Walmart (11%). The remaining 34% of customers could be considered potential specialty customers for a smaller CE business or an audio video dealer.

Of the customers who would be turning to big-box stores to satisfy their CE needs, the following reasons were given for their choices.

40 % Price

29% Product Selection

22% Store Location

The lukewarm news for CE specialists is neither great nor terrible, because these customers who shop based on price and location are not as likely to appreciate the benefits of working with a CE specialist anyway. They are mostly transactional customers who do not require a high level of customer service, and are not necessarily the ideal candidates to which CE specialists market. So, unfortunately, there may only be a precious minority of CC customers that will become customers of CE specialists, like Advanced Technology Services.

With Circuit City on the verge of their liquidation sale, consumers are already starting to shop elsewhere. A tidbit of advice: don’t forget your local businesses and dealers! Businesses like Advanced Technology Services help you get the best return on your investment in the consumer electronics you choose to purchase. Along with the personal customer service you receive during your purchasing decision, you will find a selection from higher quality and feature-rich products and services, as well as continued support over time as you use them. Also, many dealers like Adv. Tech Services are experienced in consulting to help you find multiple solutions to your CE desires. We offer products and services in several areas of residential, commercial, and mobile applications from internet connectivity to audio video equipment to home security. Contact us so we can help you get started down the road to your technological goals!

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March 6, 2009 Posted by | Industry News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sony Presents New Product Line

sony imageAt the Sony dealer show in Las Vegas this week, several new product lines for home theater design were disclosed, including , networked Bravia HDTVs Blu-Ray players, A/V receivers, and Home Theater Systems. Though these exciting upcoming releases have been introduced, most of them will not be available for purchase until later this year.

The latest version of networked Bravia LCD HDTVs has been dubbed the W-series. The TVs from this series use Motionflow120Hz technology and the BRAVIA Engine 3, which both contribute to a smoother, clearer, sharper picture. Models include the 52-inch KDL-52W5100, 46-inch KDL-46W5100, and 40-inch KDL-40W5100.

Among the Blu-Ray players that were shown are a couple of stand-alone players, which range from $300-350. These models are the BDP-S360 and BDP-S560, which both deliver full HD 1080/60p and 24p True Cinema output and will be available summer 2009. Two other players are the DVP-FX730 and DVP-FX930, portable DVD players that are priced at $130 and $190 respectively.

The HT-SS360 is an integrated A/V receiver, which supports full HD 1080p video and high-resolution audio, costing $350 and available in May 09. In addition, the STR-DN1000 receiver ($500) is available July 09 and includes four HDMI inputs and three component inputs, analog connections, and S-Air technology. Other models of this receiver range from $150-300.

The newest Sony home theater systems include models BDV-E300 and BDV-E500W. These are Blu-Ray sony_davdz860w1home theater systems which boast wi-fi capability for using BD-live access and S-Air wireless audio compatible systems. They also feature Sony’s Digital Media Port which allows for music playback options for diverse accessories. The BDV-E300 costs $600 and is S-Air ready, but optional modules must be purchased separately. However, the BDV-E500W costs $800 and is integrated with various S-Air capabilities, which allow audio to be transmitted up to 164 feet away from the main system for rear surround sound speakers or up to 10 AirStation devices in the home. Three other home theater systems presented were the DAV-HDX587WC, DAV-HDX589W, and DAV-HDX285 systems, which range from $300-430, run on 1,000 watts, and include a five-disc DVD/CD changer.

March 5, 2009 Posted by | General Information, New Products | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Meeting of the Minds at the Greener Gadgets Conference

This is held once a year! A must see

This is held once a year! A must see

New York City just hosted last week’s “Greener Gadgets Conference” to aid in the awareness of making consumer electronics “greener” in the ways they are manufactured, used, and disposed. Co-produced by CES sponsor, CEA, this is the second of these annual meetings. The topics discussed at the GGC stem from a public concern about the need for eco-friendly products now. It is no longer a problem that only will one day face our descendents, because it is affecting us now.

A primary concern that arised at the conference was whether manufacturing standards reflect this need to be “green.” Though there a growing popularity of marketing the eco-friendliness of products and services, when will standards show the value of making “green” products by reflecting this trend as well? Indeed, people who are shopping for “green” CES are also concerned with product efficiency and performance, mainly in the department of saving energy. Unfortunately, the measurable effects on environment such as carbon footprint are only made aware to businesses and government, while consumers see savings in the form of dollar signs.

At the Greener Gadgets Conference, recyclability was a large topic on the table. The functioning of

just some ideas with more to come

just some ideas with more to come

programs and end result for recyclable products offered up by consumers were the main ideas discussed. According to David Thompson, director of Panasonic’s Corporate Environmental Department, the pressure is on manufacturers of electronics to remain environmentally conscious through all the activities of business, including use of their products. Panasonic is teaming up with Toshiba and Sharp in the MRM Co. (Manufacturers Recycling Management Company), which is a shareholder in the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation. As a Sharp dealer, Advanced Technology Services is proud of the efforts that are being made by these companies to respect and preserve our environment.

Other efforts by companies and individuals to create new “green” products and programs were showcased at the conference. For instance, customers are now able to buy carbon offset cards for their mobile phones according to Michael Newman, vice president of cell phone recycler ReCellular. Four inventions to make consumers aware of energy usage were displayed at the conference. One was the power hog piggy bank, a plug-in device for children that helps them understand energy usage. Also, a wooden indoor laundry drying rack creates less energy waste because there is less dryer usage. The tweet-a-watt is a device set up to relay a consumers’ energy usage to friends via twitter. Finally, the laundry pod was introduced, an electricity-free washer that operates like a salad spinner. The field of CE is looking for more and more ways to be “green,” so stay tuned!

March 4, 2009 Posted by | 1 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Shopping Tips for a Home Theater System: Part 2

hometheateraccessoriesWhen shopping for a home theater system, you’ve got to check out the details of your potential product in the following categories. Will your “soon-to-be-adopted” TV make the cut?

Visual

When considering the important decision making factors of the visual aspect, focus on the following three features: display type, resolution, and screen size. The type of display you choose will most likely be decided by your budget, the size of the room, the location of the TV in the room, and lighting conditions. Three types of displays that can achieve a desirable image larger than life are flat panels (LCD or plasma), rear-projectors, and front-projectors. LCDs, plasmas, and rear-projectors can display HD images up to 70 inches, while the front-projectors can show an image up to around 10 feet. For a room with much light, LCD is a stronger option. For a dimly lit room, go for plasma or a projection display. The resolution is a semi-important factor when choosing between a non-HD television and an HD television. For a screen size of 30 inches or more, HD is going to make a visible difference to the viewer. However, when comparing HD models, the differences between resolutions are slightly less noticeable unless you are sitting within 10 feet of the screen. A good rule to follow when deciding on the screen size is that the diagonal measurement should not be larger than half of your seating distance. For example, a 60 inch screen should be viewed from at least 10 feet away (120 inches).

Audio

To create the ultimate surround sound experience, you will want a 7 speaker system plus a subwoofer (for extra strong bass). However, the size of your room and the size of your budget may be satisfied with a set of 5 or even 3 speakers. The most important set to start with will include a left, center, and right speaker. It is better to buy high-quality and low-quantity, because you can always add to your collection as your budget grows and room size changes. After securing the three speakers, add a subwoofer first and satellite speakers next. Now you’re on your way to the full home theater experience.

Video Source

Consider that the picture you see on the screen originates from your DVD player, and therefore is limited by the type of resolution allowed by the player and input/output connections. You obviously want the highest resolution possible on your screen, since you’ve invested the money in a TV that is capable of displaying a gorgeous picture. Ideally, use an HDMI connection if at all possible and then use a component connection as a second choice. If you want more info on specifics of several types of input/output, see our blog entitled, “Audio/Video Input for Dummies (AKA Beginners)” on our blog home page. A television with several connection points of various types is a big bonus when hooking up several output devices, such as DVD players, CD players, video cameras, and game consoles. Remember that some of these devices like VCRs and video cameras may require an S-video input or composite input.

Secondly, traditional DVD players operate in 480i output, like most TV broadcast stations do. Upconverting DVD players can produce HD-resolutions of up to 720p, 1080i, or 1080p. However, most HDTVs actually do this process of upconverting internally. The best option is to go with a high-definition DVD player or Blu-Ray player, which both play discs that are originally written in HD language.

As a side note, be sure to consider whether the following will be important factors for you personally. Some people choose to use a DVD player also as a CD player. This makes it possible to listen to music CDs as well as CD-Rs and CD-RWs that contain music files. If this meets your needs, then check to see if the DVD player supports multiple disc formats. In addition, decide if you want the convenience of a multiple disc player that can hold several DVDs and CDs at once.

Lastly, but not of least importance, look to purchase these products from a reliable and supportive retailer (like Advanced Technology Services!) that will help you find the exact products that work for you, and will follow up with installation and customer support. The most important thing is that you go home satisfied and stay that way as you continue to use your home theater system throughout your life.

March 2, 2009 Posted by | 1 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

LG Quitting on Plasmas: Fact or Fiction?

LG signSuspicion is that rumors are flying about the possibility of LG leaving the market as a plasma producer. LG’s vice-president, Lee Gyu-Hong, has been reported as saying that the future is uncertain for LG in the plasma sector. If LG does pull out of the market, they would be following the recent resignations of Vizio and Pioneer plasma. These changes would leave all the work to only three major manufacturers on the plasma market – Panasonic, Samsung, and Hitachi. Is this a sign of doomsday for the plasma TV or will the lack of competition cause Panasonic, Samsung, and Hitachi to rack up in sales? It seems that manufacturers are pulling away slowly as profitability decreases, going from six major brands to a possible three in the timespan of a few months!

Shortly after this rumor of LG’s withdrawal hit the media, there was a contradictory response from George Mead, Marketing Manager for Digital Displays at LG Electronics UK. He said reportedly that the UK division of LG did not intend to withdraw from the plasma market at all, although there were discussions going on at LG about the major changes going on currently in the plasma market. Other specifics from his conversation seem to support the idea that LG is doing well in the UK, but what about the US market? LG’s recent release of the LGH9000 plasma television, which uses a wireless HDMI connection, leads us to believe that LG, as a company, will persevere. Is it possible that LG would continue to prosper in other markets while withdrawing from the US market, like Phillips did last year?

As a Pioneer dealer and Samsung dealer, Advanced Technology Services wants to continue to support our customers through this time of change in the plasma market. We will continue to offer superior customer service to those who have purchased Pioneer televisions from us. Please comment on our blog below or contact us via our website with any questions, thoughts, or concerns.

February 28, 2009 Posted by | HDTV, Industry News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Tips for Buying a Home Theater System Pt. 1

movie-theaterGoing to the movie theater has been a popular social pastime for decades. Is it the enormous screen, the engulfing sound, or the popcorn that keeps people coming back for more $10 movies they could easily rent on DVD or Blu-Ray? That theater experience is something to which we have become addicted and have now begun to implement into our homes. So how do you know what items and features to choose to make your home theater all you could wish for?

First of all, there are three main components of a home theater system: display, DVD player, and speakers. The name of the game seems to be “bigger is better,” but this is not always the case.

A clear, high-resolution picture on a wide screen is the most important factor of the display. Wide screens televisions operate a 16:9 aspect ratio, which, in comparison to the older television ratio of 4:3, comes closer to the picture displayed on a theater screen. DVDs are formatted for wide screen as well, and most tvs that are 27 inches or more measured diagonally, will display high-definition images. Three types of televisions to look for are flat panels (such as LCD or plasma), rear projectors, and front projectors.

A surround sound system will create a theater-like sound of quality and precision that will make you feel as if you are a part of the movie. The six-speaker system includes left, center, and right speakers, as well as two satellite speakers and a subwoofer. These systems are available from manufacturers like JBL, Bose, and Paradigm. A recent popular purchase is the “home theater in a box,” which usually includes a DVD player and set of speakers that mimic the sound of a full surround sound system.

To make these two elements of picture and sound all they can be, you have to start with the source. Byhome_movie_theater now, most people are convinced that a DVD player outputs a higher quality picture than a VHS player, and they are right in this assumption. The difference is 540 horizontal lines of resolution compared to 200 lines. The best quality comes from an HD DVD player or Blu-Ray player, which play discs that have been originally formatted in high-definition, not standard-definition.

Take it all in, young grasshopper, and we’ll talk more in our next blog about the specs to shop for in each of these three elements.

For more info on Home Theater installation contact us or view some examples or Home Theater System(s). Feel free to check them out or contact us anytime!

to be continued………..

February 13, 2009 Posted by | 1 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Flat Panel TVs: Is Buying Cheap Brands Worth Saving Dollars?

no-walmartBig distributors like Walmart, Sam’s Club, and Costco are turning out less expensive flat-panel televisions almost as quickly as milk and eggs. While this might be a slight exaggeration, it seems that as the price of these TVs declines, the quality does the same. When is it worth it to save the money, and when should you be worried you are actually wasting dollars on a low-quality product?

Surely you are looking for the best bang for the buck, even if it means you may have to make a slightly larger investment for a better return on your money. If you are not penny-pinching, it is best to go for a better quality product from your local audio video dealer, like us, Advanced Technology Services. If you are penny-pinching, maybe it is not the right time to be buying a flat-panel television!

panasonicRemember that most of the televisions sold on discount in large distribution-style stores are often stripped of the best features that can be found with the devices that we, as a Toshiba and Pioneer Elite dealer, sell and service on a consistent basis. These TVs in stores may also be made by brands you are not familiar with. The products and brands we sell have passed the test of time. Sometimes, finding positive feedback and reviews for many of these new, cheap, no-name brands is tough.

It is important, when choosing the right television, to listen to the audio, check out the connections, and put your “hands-on” the product you are buying, in addition to just seeing the screen. It’s a big purchase and you should be completely satisfied with your choice! We are happy to demonstrate the product you are interested in buying, answer any questions, inform you of the products offerings, and provide product support after your purchase.

If you are looking to build a new home theater system or a RV satellite system feel free to give us a call or email anytime!!

February 11, 2009 Posted by | HDTV, Industry News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1080p 1080i what’s the dif?

pioneer-elite-kuro-signature-hdtvHave you or a friend recently purchased the latest, top of the line television?  Is the TV supposed to have the clearest resolution available at 1080p?  But is doesn’t?  So, you might be asking yourself:  If I bought a 1080p television, why is the resolution only 1080i or lower?

First of all, most cable and HD Satellite broadcasters only operate in 1080i or 720p.  The television may be capable of a 1080p resolution picture for your stellar home theater design, but it can only display one that is broadcast in that same resolution.  If the picture is 720p, that is what will be seen on the screen, but remember that a 1080p is also capable of fully resolving any picture less that 1080p.  A 720p television will have to scale down the resolution of the picture to meet its native resolution.  Although right now, broadcasters are full of networks operating in 1080i/720p, it is rumored that satellite providers may be offering a full line up of 1080p channels.

Secondly, if your DVD player or other input is not 1080p “quality,” then again, the television will scale down the resolution to that of the lower-resolution device.  Recommended player include Blu-Ray, X-Box, Playstation 3, or an HD DVD player.  These devices are capable of playing a DVD that is originally written in 1080p resolution.

February 5, 2009 Posted by | 1 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

House Votes Against Delaying Digital Conversion

house-of-representativesHouse Votes Against Delaying Digital Conversion When brought up for vote in the House of Representatives, the bill proposing a delay of the digital broadcast conversion from February 17 to June 12, was defeated. It did not receive a two-thirds majority vote, which was needed to pass the bill. The vote was 258 in favor (236-Dem, 22-Rep) and 168 against (155-Rep, 13-Dem). The bill could be brought up again for regular floor vote, in which case, it would only require a majority vote to be passed. The “mostly” democratic support of the bill to delay the conversion is based on the fact that they believe that a large number of households (6.5 million) are unprepared for the conversion, a statistic which is confirmed by the Nielsen Co. These citizens are particularly among the poor, rural, and low-income representation of Americans, who either live in areas that receive major stations through analog signal or can’t afford to purchase the equipment necessary to receive signal after the conversion. The government has made coupons available for $40 toward the purchase of a digital conversion box; however there is currently a wait list of 3.2 million requests. The National Telecommunications & Information Administration is only sending out new coupons as older, unredeemed coupons reach the 90-day expiration. Joe Barton, republican congressman of Texas, is pushing for legislation that will aid in this problem without postponing the conversion. Most republicans feel there is no need to delay the conversion. Those against the bill believe that it would incur heavy costs for public safety agencies and wireless companies who are waiting to use the spectrum that will become free after the conversion. Television stations, as well, would be required to pay more to operate both systems for several more months, an expense that is most likely not built into this year’s budget. In addition, Jonathan Collegio, of the National Association of Broadcasters, has voiced that the Nielsen Co.’s statistic on number of unprepared households does not take in to account those who have purchased a converter box and not installed it; those who have requested, but not received coupons; or those who subscribe to cable or satellite television for their home theater system. The Obama administration has not made a comment in reference to the outcome of the vote.

February 4, 2009 Posted by | Digital Conversion | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The CEC: Consumer Electronic Control

HDMI is a structural channel that simplifies cabling and provides the gateway to system-wide intelligence.  For HDMI nevocompliant devices, there is a “universal” remote that can be used, called the consumer electronic control (CEC).  This technology allows multiple electronic devices to be linked together for simultaneous usage by remote.  The remote can connect to a number of multiple devices that support the CEC technology.  This allows easy use of a fully furnished home theater system.  For instance, a camcorder and HD satellite supported television may be powered on/off at the same time with the push of only one button.  An HDTV remote will be able to select the correct input automatically on an A/V receiver and a television by simply pushing play on the DVD player.

Another fantastic use of the CEC is the “remote control pass through” application.  Instead of using a secondary device to receive the infrared signal so that devices behind opaque surfaces in the entertainment center can still be used, the HDTV remote may be used to control all of the other hidden devices as well.  Also, a CEC enabled HDTV remote can change channels on the set-top box tuner, without the need of a separate remote control.

There is no programming necessary, like with the traditional universal remote.  Also, the devices a consumer wants to sync up do not need to be made by the same manufacturer.  Any device that supports CEC technology will be compatible with the remote control.

February 2, 2009 Posted by | New Products | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment